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Canada Day 2010: Granville Island

2010 Winter Games Commemorative Book

June 9th, 2010 @ 10:19am (PT) by Rebecca Bollwitt

Yesterday I received a copy of the official 2010 Winter Games commemorative book, which probably has one of the longest titles I’ve seen: With Glowing Hearts: The Official Commemorative Book of the XXI Olympic Winter Games and the X Paralympic Winter Games/Des plus brillants exploits: Le livre commémoratif officiel des XXIes Jeux olympiques d hiver et des Xes Jeux paralympiques d hiver.

With Glowing Hearts - Vancouver 2010 Commemorative Book

Cracking open the hardcover I was met with a quote from John Furlong that immediately choked me up. All that I felt during the Olympics and Paralympics came rushing back. It was much more than emotion, sometimes it was even the stress of covering a global event in my backyard for 14 hours a day (which was all completely worth it).

With Glowing Hearts - Vancouver 2010 Commemorative Book

The pages in this book and the beautiful photography evoke a sense of pride and nostalgia, even though it commemorates something that was mere months ago.

With Glowing Hearts - Vancouver 2010 Commemorative Book

I wrote 118 blog posts during the Olympics (not including the Paralympics), uploaded over 600 photos and received 2180 comments on my site over the span of the event. Every single word, image, and video compilation I put together has a story behind it and looking at this book only adds to that experience. With 400 pages and 1,200 photos, it’s pretty stunning.

With Glowing Hearts - Vancouver 2010 Commemorative Book

The book kick-starts memories and showcases everyone from gold medal athletes to blue jacket volunteers (who are all listed within). There’s a profile on Shaun White, concert photography from Live City, a tribute to Nodar Kumaritashvili, a complete section on the Paralympics, and even Tweets have been pulled in for some of the photo gallery pages.

With Glowing Hearts - Vancouver 2010 Commemorative Book

With Glowing Hearts - Vancouver 2010 Commemorative Book With Glowing Hearts - Vancouver 2010 Commemorative Book

With Glowing Hearts - Vancouver 2010 Commemorative Book

One of my favourite elements is that it showcases the fans quite a bit. There are full-page spreads featuring nothing but maple leaf painted faces, waving flags from all nations, and swarms of people in good spirits.

With Glowing Hearts - Vancouver 2010 Commemorative Book

The book is currently available on Amazon, from Wiley (the publisher) and in bookstores across Canada. I would recommend this for anyone who experienced the Games in any way and especially those who couldn’t. It’s about our city, province, and our nation that bonded through the torch relay, supporting our athletes, and the collective experience.

With Glowing Hearts - Vancouver 2010 Commemorative Book

“The spirit and soul of all 33 million Canadians has been sewn into the fabric of these Winter Games. This journey has not been about the few but rather the many.” – John Furlong.

Disclosure: cmp.ly/1

Update June 11, 2010 I have just been offered another copy of the book to give away to one of my readers.

If you would like to enter to win this book, please leave a comment below with your favourite Olympic memory. I’ll draw a winner on June 16th and have the book shipped over to you.

I just wanted to stress how much this book has grown on me. It’s almost like a yearbook that I want to take around town and have people sign, it’s pretty great.

Update June 16, 2010 I have drawn a winner at random from the entries and it is Michelle (June 11th comment / @depechemama on Twitter). Thank you so much for sharing your favourite moments. The highlights for many were the feeling of togetherness and the pride we felt for our athletes and our nation. It’s just amazing to see that so many people will have memories like this to last them a lifetime.

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156 comments

  1. A L says:

    That’s a beautiful-looking book.

  2. Scott says:

    Can’t wait to get my copy. I hope it’s waiting for me when I get back home next week.

  3. Diane says:

    Do you have any idea why it’s already in stores but still hasn’t been shipped to people who pre-ordered? Or why pre-orders were $85 but it’s only $53 at Amazon and $56 at Chapters?? I’m sure I’m going to love the book, but yet another Olympic rip-off is really making me mad.

  4. Isabel says:

    Bar none, my favourite moment was watching Sidney Crosby win it for Canada. What an incredible moment for all of us.

  5. Jennifer says:

    Gold Medal Mens Hockey Game – the one hour that it took me to walk one block downtown after the win… the vibe, the energy, the excitement being with my fellow Canadians. UNBELIEVABLE!!!

  6. Michelle says:

    My favourite Olympic memory was running with my husband downtown to the Olympic Cauldron, and getting there just moments before Wayne Gretzky did, and watching him light the cauldron. The entire crowd swelled to hundreds within minutes, and then as soon as the cauldron was lit, everyone broke out into a thundering rendition of ‘Oh Canada’. Definately brings tears to my eyes again reliving that moment. A great Canadian moment to be a part of.

  7. Marina says:

    My favourite memory is a tie between Jon Montgomery and his pitcher of beer and Alexandre Bilodeau winning Canada’s first gold medal on Canadian soil. Oh, I miss the Olympics!!

  8. Aaron says:

    I was one of the hockey players in the closing cermonies. Watching the gold medal game in a room full of 500 guys dressed like mounties, lumberjacks and hockey players was a real treat!

  9. Graeme says:

    For me, it was just sitting around Robson Square, filled with fans from around the world, and soaking up the experience with my two little girls. It was amazing hosting the world, and an experience that I’ll never forget.

  10. Jess Brady says:

    my favorite part of the olympics was all the Canadian pride and the Gold medal mens game!! there was so much love for everyone that day it was just an amazing feeling to be in the middle of downtown with everyone!!!!

    as well watching our 1st gold medal on canadian soil!!!!! Alexandre Bilodeau should be soporud of himself!!

  11. ming says:

    I loved watching Marianne St-Gelais cheering on Charles Hamlin to one of his gold-medal wins… So much enthusiasm.

  12. Adam says:

    My favourite memory was when we won Hockey Gold! Standing outside, near Terry Fox Plaza… the street awash with crowds of cheering people from all over the world (though mostly from across Canada)! Even the snipers on the adjacent rooftops were jumping and dancing when we won gold, and the roar was so deafening I could barely hear my fellow volunteers around me. It may have been the last day of the Olympic games, but just thinking about it still sends shivers down my back! Best. Day. Ever.

  13. Tony says:

    Well, the vibe in the city after the gold medal game was most memorable. My kids had a great moment when the pairs skating gold medalists came and gave a speech at the Robson ice rink, just feet from where they sat. Good memories all around.

  14. Valerie says:

    Listening on to the city, from my balcony, roaring after our Gold Medal Hockey win!

  15. Karmen says:

    I was so excited to watch Canada host again … I cannot recall a single specific moment but it would be all the Canadian wins … a welcome thank you to a country that has hosted these games too often with gaining substantial wins

  16. Dom says:

    My favourite memory was being on Granville island with my wife and son, standing outside the Keg, looking in the window at the big screens. There was a large crowd gathered outside to see Alexandre Bilodeau winning Canada’s first gold medal on Canadian soil. Fantastic moment.

  17. Taylor says:

    By far the best Oympic moment for me was during the curling matches – high-tense suspense, strategy, and lots of close calls made for some great action from a sport you wouldn’t expect that much fun from! And if not that, the Closing Ceremonies was a pretty awesome end-all party!

  18. kelly m says:

    My favorite memory was when I was @ yaletown to watch the mens gold medal game and I saw with my own eyes in OT that crosby scored the golden goal

  19. Mark Edmondson says:

    Standing with Moyse and Humphries families at the womens bobsleigh as they finished first and second.

    After attending around 8 events and seeing no Canadian medals, we lucked upon some tickets for this (our final) event and were happily rewarded.

  20. Julie says:

    I absolutely loved every single minute of it. How can you choose just one moment when every minute of the day was filled with such joy and spirit? It was an amazing experience and I’m truly proud to have taken part in it.

  21. shannon miller says:

    What a lovely book!

    My favorite 2010 Vancouver Games memory was – even as a US citizen – to join in the celebration as Alexandre Bilodeau won the first Gold Medal for Canada on their home soil.
    What a gorgeous memory!

  22. Luke says:

    ooooh what a nice looking book, thanks for the contest!
    Luke

  23. MichelleJ says:

    It was extremely difficult for me to pick a favourite. However, if I have to choose just one, I would say that my favourite Olympic memory was watching the Canadian Flag rise during the medal ceremony for our first gold medal on home soil, and hearing our glorious national anthem being sung by the pride stricken and emotional crowd. What a great day for Canada.

  24. Alison says:

    The best part of the olympics was feeling the canadian pride & spirit that warmed your heart. Seeing everybody so proud of their country & heritage and the smiles and the happiness, nothing like it!

  25. Liz says:

    It’s hard to pick just one favourite memory. Bilodeau’s gold, Rochette’s skate, hockey gold… even the atmosphere of Vancouver was a great memory overall.

  26. Michele says:

    There are so many moments as I worked downtown everyday, but watching as Alex Bilodeau received his medal was amazing. And seeing the bouquet presented was emotional especially knowing the story behind the women who made them.

  27. Rob says:

    Favourite memory is watching Canada win gold on home soil and seeing the people around the city go wild!

  28. Donna says:

    I flipped through this book at the bookstore the other day, it’s insanely gorgeous. Took everything not to cry right there.

    I was fortunate enough to attend the Closing Ceremonies. Favourite memory has got to be seeing all the athletes spill into the stadium, all united, all celebrating, all smiles.

  29. Marianne says:

    It’s so hard to pick a favourite memory from the Games. Watching the Women’s Gold Medal Hockey game at Heineken House, watching John Montgomery win gold in skeleton outside CTV studios on Robson street with 100’s of other people, checking out every pavilion I possibly could, or volunteering for 12 days at Canada Hockey Place – so much happened!

  30. Bozo says:

    Favorite moment was when Crosby scored the OT goal…

  31. Kelly H says:

    My best moments were the whole 2 weeks of events. My family and I were able to attend several events, and the whole Vancouver downtown functions. Very proud to be Canadian.

  32. Joy says:

    the story of Alex Bilodeau and his brother.

  33. BurnabyAnn says:

    the Vancouver Olympics & ParaOlympics were a joyous time for me. I was exhausted through most of it as I worked full time shift work & spent as time as possible @ Olympic venues. i was in Surrey, Richmond & Vancouver so much, working often after a sleepless night(or day) the people I met, the sights I saw, the things I learned will stay with me forever. I’ve moved my Olympic gear out of my living & into my home office so I can still relive the moments!

  34. Brenda says:

    My favourite Olympic memory was being downtown after the men’s gold medal hockey game.

  35. Sanae says:

    the building excitement and patriotic feelings over the two weeks, and the red mittens!

  36. Katie says:

    It is impossible for me to choose one favorite memory from the 2010 Vancouver Olympic Winter games, because there are so many, but I will share a few that inspired me. During the opening ceremonies during the parade of nations I got chills when Georgia walked out, and be applauded by the world for their strength. It was at that moment that I realized that although the Olympics are a series of competitions, they bring us together, and give us common hope. In the mens Moguls, I was inspired by Alexandre Bilodeau’s story, and will to win. I was given hope when J.R. Celski, a kid that nearly bled to death because of his sport not only skate, but also receive a bronze medal. Seeing Shaun White, a California kid who came into the Olympics expected to do great things lived up to those expectations, showed me that if I try hard enough, anything is possible. Evan Lysacek winning the gold without doing a quad gave me the opportunity to see that it’s not what you can do, but how you do it. When Steve Holcomb and the night train won the gold, it reminded me that I can overcome any obstacle. I was on my feet cheering for every hockey game, and no matter who won the game I was still happy, because for those players, being there was an accomplishment. I was not only inspired by the people that won medals, but all the people that participated. They proved to me that win or lose, they were committed to their sport, and proud of their accomplishments. In my room there are pictures of athletes, from all different countrys, hung up on my walls to remind me that all my hopes and dreams are possible, as long as I put my heart into it. I currently have a website open on my computer counting down to the next Olympics, because I can’t wait to be inspired again by people who are only trying to fulfill their dreams, and represent their country. Every day in February I would sit at school counting down the minutes waiting to go home and watch someone do something great, because thats what the Olympics are about, reminding us that there is greatness inside all of us. I think that is pretty memorable.

  37. tracey says:

    I took my 10 year old daughter out of school for the day. We went downtown vancouver, visited a bunch of sites and took lots of pictures…but the most fun we had was taking the skytrain to a men’s curling event and seeing our guys win. What a fun day alone with my girl.

  38. Josh says:

    My best memory would have to be working at the Olympic Store. Meeting athletes (especially the Canadian ones!) and people from all over the world cheering on for their nation’s best was a big highlight for me.

  39. Tuija Seipell says:

    My favourite memory: Very early morning, the day before opening, absolutely pitch dark in Stanley Park. We are running past the Pooh Day care to be in place for the torch relay. In the absolute darkness and silence of the park, we see and hear the bright, noisy, Coke pre-torch truck jamming away full blast on the other side of Lost Lagoon! It felt so out-of-place there, and at the same time so exhilarating and fun. But the best was to come. The truck long gone, a handful of us early-morning runners, waiting beside the underpass. We are in complete silence, total darkness. And then, we see the torch runner coming toward us along the upper level Lost Lagoon. Gentle, beautiful, breathtaking, exhilarating, humbling, uplifting. Not a dry in the group as the torch passed us. I’m still choking as I write this.

  40. Maggie says:

    I hate to be lumped in with the majority of people, but the gold medal hockey game was definitely my most memorable moment – I’m going to remember for the rest of my life where I was when Crosby scored that goal, and all the random high fives that strangers gave each other on the streets promptly after. Besides that though, the atmosphere downtown was absolutely electric; you could literally feel the energy and would be swept away by it. I also loved the random bursts of O Canada that I’d participate in whenever I got the chance – on the skytrain, along the streets…it really was an amazing two weeks.

  41. Matt says:

    My favourite memory from the 2010 Vancouver Winter Olympics wasn’t so much a single event as it was an experience. I work evenings and overnights right downtown at Georgia and Granville. Every night was a celebration. You could not walk downtown and not see at least a dozen different brightly coloured tourist supporting their country. And to boot, they were all happy (let’s just ignore the fact a lot of open alcohol was flowing on the street parties!) There was little to no competitiveness off of the Olympic tracks. Two moments in particular that I will never forget are firstly, the intersection of Robson and Granville at night. It was literally a mosh pit. A sea of red and white. Breaking into chants of OLE, and then doing a patriotic rendition of a spontaneous O Canada, and then back to OLE. Beautiful. The other moment I, nor the country, will forget is downtown after Canada won the gold. I was able to watch the game at home, and then I had to make my way downtown to work that evening. Granville Bridge closed. Viaducts were already closed. I was one of the last few to venture across the Burrard Bridge before that too was closed for crowd control. It took 45 minutes to go from the bridge to Pender, and it was the 45 minutes I’ve most felt proud to be a part of my city, my country.

  42. Marlene says:

    Seeing the Canadian pride while we were walking with family and friends thru Vancouver…

  43. Kelsey says:

    Thanks for holding this contest! I flipped through the book at Chapters… and words cannot describe how amazing it is!! I feel so incredibly lucky to have experienced the Olympic spirit in my hometown!

    My favourite Vancouver 2010 memory would probably be all of the figure skating events! The athletes were so graceful and powerful on the ice. Tessa and Scott were breathtaking, and who could ever forget Joannie Rochette’s inspirational performances? :)

  44. Julie says:

    My favourite Vancouver 2010 Olympic memory is the feeling of pride and excitement that we all shared. It was so much fun walking around downtown and sharing the moment with everyone and meeting people from all over the world.
    Of course, the all time best moment was The Hockey Game. Sharing the gold medal win with my family and friends at the Quebec Pavilion was one of the best moments of my life.

  45. Kristi says:

    My favorite was simply being downtown and experiencing canadian pride at it’s strongest ever! What an amazing 17 days!!

  46. Howard says:

    I was a volunteer in the Main Media Centre and I’ll never forget the emotion in the green room before the press conference to discuss Nodar’s death at Whistler. The press conference could not start on time as the panel was in tears. The air was sucked out of the MMC that day!

  47. Rachel says:

    Watching Canada’s winning hockey game

  48. maria says:

    Walking around d/t and never seeing that many happy people in my life!!

  49. Alison says:

    Walking along Robson St after the gold medal hockey game.. I’ve never ‘high-fived’ so many people in my life. Just incredible!

  50. angela says:

    All the free concerts in town!

  51. Stephanie S says:

    My favorite moment was watching the opening ceremony! Well and also Norways mens curling team just to see their awesome pants!

  52. Jeff says:

    When I was walking downtown with a friend of mine, who is American, he was scared to tell anyone he was from the US lol.

  53. Katherine says:

    Outstanding Memory… In Vancouver Village, helping the teams and athletes get organized and on the buses to go to Opening Ceremonies… the excitement and energy was electric… and the games were to begin, the possibility of what was to come was waiting for us…. and then so many more outstanding moment..

  54. Laura says:

    My fave moment would have to be…… Hmmm how can I pick just one?! I guess the most memorable would be giving Jenn Heil directions on where to get a cab after the first men’s hockey game & being so tongue tied that I forgot to say congrats on our first Canadian medal of the games. Sorry, Jenn! Oh wait, I have another one! Nothing like telling The Great One that he didn’t have access to the elevator that would get him to the backstage of the Opening Ceremonies. Either one is great so take your pick.

  55. Albert Giesbrecht says:

    I was suffering from Bursitis in my knee, but I made it to watch Curling. On the way home, I went on the Canada Line and one of the coaches of the Dutch team, helped me sit down as I couldn’t quite bend down to sit in the seat offered to me by an elderly woman. The coach pushed me down onto the seat by my shoulder, and the lady grabbed my coat and they both dragged me down onto the seat.

    Beyond sports, the Olympics is about people coming together to help our fellow Man.

  56. bekki says:

    My favourite memory was Alex Bilodeau winning the first gold… on Valentine’s Day.

  57. Jae Sang says:

    The 2010 Winter Games was an AMAZING experience. My friends, family annd I created MANY MANY memories… but the best one will always be my experience in the Anthem Cast of the Closing Ceremonies. As we waited in the tunnel and ring road, all 1000 of us were excited and chirping like a bunch of birds, people were getting their snowbard signed and stuff. Then, as we moved up the ramp to await the official beginning, we saw the last leg of the cauldron rise and get lit. That put us the the excited and energized mood to Countdown to the Closing Ceremonies. When we finally arrived on stage, the people in the Stadium erupted the loudest cheer I’ve ever heard. Everyone just kept saying to each other “OMG, it’s finally here, three months of practice paid off.” (The next part is really hard to describe so I’ll leave the emotions out of it) As Inward Eye played Strong and Free, we counted down and opened the ceremonies, then displayed Strong and Free. Finally, we welcomed the official party, and as everyone stood tall and proud, we sang O Canada (the dude next to me had a few tears). Then we exploded our death star formation and left the stadium. Ending our Olympic Ceremonies Experience. It was one happy, three month long memory that will stay with me for the rest of my life. (note: dancing under the cauldron wearing a sweater and scarf and trying to swing a snowbard is and extremely warm experiene.)

  58. Amy says:

    My favourite is going to the various celebration sites in Vancouver and Richmond and enjoying the games with people from all over the world! It really gave me a sense of pride and unity!

  59. Rob says:

    Making it to Vancouver during the Olympic Games was an opportunity of a lifetime. The entire experience was unforgettable. One of my memorable moments (there are so many) was in front of the convention centre near the cauldron a few days after Jon Montgomery won the gold medal. As I was walking by I noticed a television crew surrounding an individual holding a large Canadian flag on a pole. They were walking towards the cauldron. People, including myself, began to recognize that it was Jon Montgomery carrying our Flag! Everyone followed him to the Olympic cauldron. There, in front of the flame, he led us in an impromptu rendition of O Canada. I gave Jon a high-five when he finished. Proud to be a Canadian!

  60. Diana says:

    My favourite memory was…Canada winning the gold medal in Men’s Hockey :) and watching Virtue and Moir dancing and winning the gold :D

  61. PamD says:

    My favourite Olympic memory was the moment after ‘the goal’. Everyone poured outside, wrapped in something red. High fives to perfect strangers and fellow celebrants. A moment of spontaneous national pride.

  62. Cameron says:

    Walking down the street after we won the gold medal hockey game, cheering, and randomly hi-fiving and hugging complete strangers.

  63. Nick says:

    My favourite moment was every time they showed the people in the streets of vancouver cheering, singing O Canada and playing street hockey. I know that happened many times, so I guess that’s favourite moments… :P

  64. Janet says:

    My favourite moment was when Crosby scored the winning goal!

  65. Samaah says:

    my favourite olympic memory was seeing alex bilodeau at a press conference, while i sat next to you! biggest regret: being too shy to introduce myself and talk to you :S seeing our athletes in action was THE BEST!

  66. Steph :) says:

    I have so many favourite Olympic memories so it’s hard to just pick one. So I’ll say it was when I was at the Coke pavilion and got one of the coveted glowing bottles after lining up for an hour and a half to get in and hoping they were giving them out.

  67. Rachael says:

    My favourite Olympic memory or memories (I have more than one):
    KD Lang performing Hallelujah at the Opening Ceremony
    John Montgomery’s village stroll in Whistler after winning gold
    Spending evenings at the Whistler Medals Plaza
    Watching my parents and my husband watching the competition at Whistler Olympic Park and Whistler Sliding Centre

  68. Aaron says:

    As an avid curler, my favourite moment has got to be the thrilling finale to the men’s curling tournament, and Kevin Martin’s well-deserved, long-overdue gold medal. As well, when our wheelchair curling team took gold for the second time in a row. The most heartbreaking moment, then, would have to be Cheryl Bernard missing her final takeout by an inch!

  69. JoDee says:

    Too many memories to mention – listening to spontaneous renditions of O Canada on the streets, having someone come up to me and offer $300 dollars for my Canada scarf (didn’t do it:), going to the Canada womens semi-final game, and hearing my building explode with noise when Crosby’s goal went in!

  70. Janice says:

    What a great memento!

  71. d says:

    I hope you don’t mind a mix of both olympic and paralympic memories. there’s a whole whack of both. going to the mint pavillion was pretty cool, especially meeting people who were also like me and willing to spend hours and hours in line to see the pavillion (but not the medals, that was another few hours extra). going to the cauldron was pretty cool too, because again of all the people there. i grew up with vancouver 2010, because i was 8 or 9 when we won the bid. seeing the flame in the cauldron really brought back memories from along the years. another moment for me was going to livecity yaletown with my school. a few days before that, i was one of about 150 who escorted the torch across false creek, and another few days before that, i was surprised by a friend who offered me tickets to the opening ceremony. dress rehearsal, but none the less, still mindblowing. paralympic memories were many. won tickets to curling and the opening ceremony through my school. then i got a call on march 11, 2010 at 8:50 pm telling me i was a torchbearer and i had 20 minutes to go downtown to change to run at 9:25. naturally, that was one of the best moments for me. as well as hearing people conspire to jump me to get at my paralympic mittens, though i’m sure that was more bark than bite. there’s billions of memories, but that’s all i can recall right now!

  72. Ariane C says:

    Being involved with social media gave me the chance to get into a lot of private events. One of my best Olympic moments was held at Birks. I sat down on a couch in order to listen to a speech being given by Fiona Forbes.

    And in walked Jenn Heil (event was being held to promote her new Olympic jewellery line): she sat down right next to me! During the entire speech, her silver medal was clutched in her left hand, not more than a few inches from my right leg. I could feel her nervous energy while waiting for her name to be called for her portion of the speech. Truly a cool morning!

  73. Tony L says:

    My favourite moment of the 2010 Olympic Winter Games was without a doubt…the game-winning goal by Sidney Crosby in overtime to defeat the Americans for the Gold Medal. This was the important moment not only for me, but for all Canadians as we were all watching when history was made. In no other circumstances: overtime, home-soil and against the Americans could there have been a better ending to the greatest olympics ever to take place! We are the best – and I AM PROUD TO BE CANADIAN :)

  74. Anna says:

    My favorite memory was to work at the Vancouver Althetes Village. I got to see the whole mens Canada hockey team dressed in suits walk pass me, making there way to the bus to be transported to Canada Hockey Place for their gold medal game.

  75. Peter vT ~ @PvT says:

    My favourite memory was simply feeling the excitement all around this city. I just tried to be a sponge and absorb it all!

  76. Elaan says:

    My favourite Olympic memory has to be the Canadian men’s gold medal game. Cheers & shouts were heard everywhere in the neighbourhood, not just at the end but throughout the game, reminding us about our shared passion and Canadian pride!

  77. Joël R. says:

    I was fortunate enough to snag free flight, accom, and hockey/LT skating tix last minute for one weekend of greatness. My absolute favorite memories are when I would randomly meet old friends from around the world in VANCOUVER, where all the world meets. Sharing those serendipitous moments with friends was priceless. Oh, and the Crosby goal, too. AND Robson. Definitely Robson. :)

  78. Gladys says:

    Favourite Olympic Moment: Having the experience of meeting and chatting with Wayne Gretzky at a downtown hotel.

  79. Lisa says:

    Gorgeous book, I will definitely be picking up a copy!

  80. chris says:

    my favorite memory was watching the fans getting into the olympics, enjoying every moment, and the spontineity. the best one was the fan who handed jon montgomery the pitcher of beer and him drinking it as he was heading to an interview on ctv. cant get anymore canadian than that.

  81. Brenda H says:

    My favorite thing about the Games was my coworker calling me to his office (he could watch the live feeds on his computer, I could not) everytime Canada was competing for a medal. It was not a very productive few weeks at work, but the energy in our office was fantastic as we all cheered for the Canadian athletes together.

  82. Naomi says:

    I was born and raised in Vancouver. I moved to Halifax NS in August of 2008. So many times my heart ached as I thought about missing the greatest event Vancouver has ever hosted. Tears flowed during many moments, from hearing the music, seeing the logo and seeing and missing the North Shore mountains that were part of my everyday scenery for 43 years.

    I was in Paris with my husband and daughter when we were fortunate
    to be able to watch the gold medal hockey game. I have been a hockey fan cheering on The Vancouver Canucks for as long as I can recall it being televised on our black and white TV on Saturday evenings.
    How special it was for me to see Canada win in my hometown, and for the winning goal to be scored by Atlantic Canada’s humble star whose hometown is just across the bridge from my new home of Halifax.

  83. Lisa says:

    My favourite memory of the games, was the first medal ever won by a Canadian at home- Alexandre Bilodeau in the men’s moguls at Cypress. All across the country you could feel the Canadian pride.

  84. Gamy says:

    My favourite memory of the olympics was the pride that we shared as Canadians to be hosting the event that translated over to all the other people across the world. Some people say that the winter games are the “smaller games” but with Vancouver 2010, people will think again when they say that. I’ve never seen such unity and spirit besides these games. From the grievances we shared for Nodar Kumaritashvili to the joyous celebrations we had for all the medals our athletes won for Canada, it was such a strong sense of unity no matter how we felt. The moment I remember the most would definitely be the men’s curling match against Great Britain when the crowd began to sing our anthem, that was magic then and there.

  85. CKhan says:

    I drove for hours with my 2yo toddler to be there for the Opening Ceremonies and we came back during the last week to be there for the action. I think the best part was the excitement/love/jubilation every time the Canadians won in hockey! How many days of just happiness and parties could happen in a row. It was spectacular to be a part of the celebration!!!

  86. Tanya says:

    My favourite memory of the Games:

    The Feeling Of Bursting With Pride At Being Canadian!

    As a new Canadian, I’ve always been deeply grateful to have been accepted in this wonderful country …

    And watching the Games, knowing that people all over the world were watching, too, marveling at the sights and sounds …

    I was (am!) SO PROUD TO BE CANADIAN … of our beautiful B.C., our fantastic volunteers, our courageous athletes, our welcoming communities …

    Thank you, Canada! :-D

  87. Kelly says:

    I was an Olympic addict, watching every second I could and crying so many times from emotion during the two weeks that I think I cried out. Celski overcoming injury to win bronze. Rochette’s emotional journey. Bilodeau winning gold. BOTH of the US/Canada hockey games. But my favorite moment was when some reporter was interviewing the Barenaked Ladies about the differences between English in the US and in Canada–US says about, Canada says aboot, and so on. Best response though? US says football, Canada says hockey!

  88. Everett Duke says:

    I was there when my country, the U.S., beat Canada in the opening round of men’s hockey. I’ll never forget it. Best $600 I ever spent!

  89. Katrin says:

    The book looks outstanding!
    It reminds me of what a superb job the organizers did as well as what a wonderful experience it was for me as a volunteer let alone the international and local visitors.
    It was the best time of my life — I’d do it again in a heartbeat!
    What a wonderful way to relive the moments!

  90. Charles says:

    Looks like a great book but… if you happened to pre-order your copy, guess what, you (like me) overpaid BIG TIME! To pre-order we all paid $85 yet if you look online at Amazon.ca or Chapters.ca it is available for $53.50 & $56.10 respectively now! And, by the way, I haven’t even received my copy yet. Thanks a lot VANOC. Job well done.

  91. Sara says:

    My favourite memory of the games was staying up all night (i’m in europe) and watch every hockey game till 5 a.m..
    That was so much fun!

  92. Curtis Penner says:

    The Vancouver 2010 games were something that I would relive in a heartbeat. The atmosphere in Vancouver was something that will never be relived, but that will leave lasting memories for thousands. Having volunteered at the Main Media Centre, I was able to be a part of the games and interact not only with the media, but with the thousands coming to visit the Olympic cauldron.

    My favourite memory would have to be standing on Robson Street when the Canadian Men’s Hockey team won the gold medal. The movement from stressful, nail-biting quietness in the street after the game was tied up and sent to overtime to the overjoyed masses celebrating Sidney Crosby’s goal is a moment in time that will never be forgotten.

    I had never been more proud to be a Canadian than I was throughout the Vancouver 2010 games.

  93. Doreen Mason says:

    My favourite Olympic memory is toasting my daughter, who lives in Austria via my lap-top screen and Skype, I with my Canadian beer and her with her Austrian ale, at the outset of the Gold Medal hockey game and again when Crosby scored the winning goal!!

    There she was throughout the game, visible on my computer screen with her sweet little Canadian tear stained and Olympically homesick face. She was so far away and yet we felt so very close. We were continentally divided and yet in one CANADIAN place. We ecstatically sang our national anthem in unison, we cheered, and we even jeered simultaneously throughout the game. We had so much to celebrate and we were able to do it together!

    Most importantly we had finally found a way to beat the block on CTV’s coverage overseas. I had tried throughout the Olympics to send her Canadian video re-caps on Facebook,Youtube links etc…all of which were blocked, or removed, thus disabling her viewing pleasure. We came up with a brain-wave for the big game! I had my lap-top, and web-cam pointed at my Canadian TV screen, while she had her European game coverage on, with a 30 second delay. I had my volume on maximum and she had her’s on mute during the play. She wanted to listen to the familiar, knowledgeable, and exitable Canadian commentators during the game, rather than the droll European ones. Yet, she enjoyed the hilarious Austrian commentators, touring Vancouver pubs and talking to patrons during the breaks and she relayed all of that great coverage to me. It was a mind boggling,high tech Olympic experience,that was hilariously funny,exciting and emotional, and we will never forget it.

  94. Jim says:

    I was a personal driver for an IOC delegate. I was so proud to be from B.C. and to hear his family’s comments on how beautiful the City of Vancouver and the trip to Whistler was. The fabulous sun shining days during the Olympics brought out all the contours of the mountains and the glistening ocean.
    My favourite memory will be the experience of being present at the Gold Medal Hockey game. I have been an avid hockey fan for all my life and have never ever experienced the euphoric joy of that day. Absolutely AWESOME!!!

  95. Rob says:

    Favourite Olympic memor(ies): I was fortunate enough to be in Vancouver for the final five days of the Games. Hard to pick an favourite memory because there were so many. I was at Hockey Canada Place for the women’s gold medal game; hearing the national anthem at game’s end following Canada’s 2-0 victory was an indelible moment that will always stay with me. Three days later when Crosby scored the overtime winner to place the men’s team at the top of the podium, I joined thousand of revellers jammed into the intersection of Robson and Granville for the post-game celebration. And let’s not forget the accomplishments of gold medallists like McIvor, Montgomery, Nesbitt, Anderson and the list goes on. ‘Gold Canada Gold!’

  96. Doreen Mason says:

    ps whoops typo. I meant ‘…exciteable, not exitable Canadian commentators, in my spiel above. lol

  97. Barbara says:

    Hi … I have 2 favourite memories … I arrived in Vancouver (my hpmetown) from my current home in Mexico, verrrrrrry late on the night before the opening of the games. I was staying in the West End. I awoke early the morning of Opening Day, made a coffee and stood at the window to admire the view of English Bay. Hmmm, a crowd was gathering on Denman and along Beach towards the Inukshuk. Then a bunch of vehicles came along Denman and finally a runner carrying the torch. I started to hear “Oh Canada” in my head and I burst into tears – of pride.

    On the last day after the emotional roller coaster of the final hockey game, I was glued to the TV for the closing ceremonies. When the torch was extinguished, I cried again… and I’m not usually a crier … really…. while the “officials” were over, I still carry that feeling of pride in my heart. In fact today, I was having coffee with some friends here in Mexico and I was relating some of my Olympic experiences with pride and I did feel it.

    I’d love to have the book to help me remember what a great 17 days it was. My only regret was not being able to stay for the Paralympics – THAT would have been amaaaaaaaaaaaaaaazing.

  98. Caroline says:

    Favourite moment: Crosby’s golden goal and all the high-fiving that went on downtown afterwards!

  99. Angie says:

    One of my fondest memories from the games was watching a piece on Clara Hughes and her work/introduction with the Right to Play organization. In this piece, she had been watching a program on the Right to Play and was was inspired– “I thought ‘If these children can find joy in their struggle, then certainly, so can I!” She ended up going into her 5000m race (in Turin), with the JOY written on her hand as inspiration. She won.

    That night I went to the medal ceremonies and watched Clara take the podium for the sixth time in her Olympic career. And while it was not gold, she was the happiest athlete I had ever seen… There might have been a tear or two on my part — I was proud.

  100. Julia says:

    I loved the gold medal men’s hockey game – the feeling was electric and so exciting!

  101. Gordon says:

    My favourite Olympic memory was watching the opening ceremonies and seeing the torch for the first time. :)

  102. Nancy says:

    Favourite memory: Singing the national anthem and watching the Canadian flag being raised at one of the medal ceremonies. Also, attending the Opening Ceremonies dress rehearsal. I loved how the crowd cheered the “athletes” as they entered the stadium. It was a great feeling!

  103. Janie says:

    My son was a volunteer driver for the International Ice Hockey Federation during the Olympics. He was soooo smart 6 years ago as a 15 year old boy to submit his name as a volunteer and he was determined to become one. You cannot imagine what a process it was and when he got the letter informing him he was to apply for police clearances, we all starting cheering knowing that soon he’d get the letter of acceptance. What a life changing experience it was for him. Therefore, his experiences were my favourite and every day that I got a call or text from him or saw his pictures on Facebook, or watched the Olympics knowing he was there, I cried either tears or cheers of joy. My favourite was probably hearing from him that he had just driven THE STANLEY CUP AND ITS HANDLERS……he was vibrating with excitement (and that was a 1:00 a.m. phone call – he had just dropped the cup off at Valeri Kamensky’s party he was hosting!). I also loved talking to him while he was at the IIHF Headquarters during the Canada-U.S. hockey game and I could hear the cheering from Hockey House on his phone! We’ll never forget these Olympics in this household!

  104. Jen says:

    I can’t pick one favourite moment. But one time that stands out is this: we lucked into tickets to the first opening ceremonies dress rehearsal. I think many of us in Vancouver had secretly been a bit worried about how the whole thing was going to go…even with all the preparations, could we pull it off and look like professionals where Canadians are often seen to lack the “class and showmanship” of other countries? But when I saw the inside of BC Place, and the ceremonies started to unfold, I was filled with so much pride. It – and by extension, the rest of the Games – was going to be AWESOME. I still believe that despite some of the complaints from foreign press (cough cough UK) our games were fantastic in just about every way. Future generations will look back and see these games as a turning point for our country in our pride, and our own peoples’ belief that we deserve a spot at the “grownups’ table” of the world. Getting choked up just thinking about it! 

  105. Pat says:

    My favourite moment had to be sitting in the stands by the disembark area during the women’s bobsled when everyone realized we had just won the gold and silver. It can’t be put into words the excitement, the pride, the party atmosphere on the side of a mountain in Whistler, BC.

  106. Lawrence says:

    The memories will stay with me forever…

  107. ute mikolajczak says:

    What a beautiful memory. I have a book from the 1982 olympics. My brother was on the rowing team that could not participate that year. We are from Germany and if you go back you will see that there was a boycot. I myself qualified when I was 15yrs for the decathelon. Where can I purchase this book. Please let me know. Thank You

  108. Val says:

    Is there much about the mascots in there? Meeting them is my favourite memory.

  109. Heidi W says:

    I have so many great memories of the Olympics, especially since it was the best Olympics for Canadians, with all the medals we won, and the fact that the country was united for so long before and after the Olympics were over. But, I must say, my most memorable moment was December 27, 2009 in Waterloo, Ontario. I was honored to be a part of the longest torch relay in Olympic history. I carried the torch at 6:04P.M. with my family by my side. It was the most amazing moment of my life and one that filled me with more pride and joy than I have felt in a long time. As the flame filled my torch, and I raised it high above my head, I could not have been more proud. To know that I was the only person in the world at that moment with the Olympic flame in my hand was totally amazing. Then to watch the flame that I had the honour of carrying with 11,999 other Canadians light the cauldron in Vancouver brought so many emotions out, from smiling to crying, knowing that the relay was officially over, and my part of history had come to a close, but the pride I will carry from that one single moment will be one I will never forget. Especially when I look at my torch, blackened with Olympic soot, sitting on my mantle! thank you VANOC and Canada for giving Canadians such an awesome Olympics and pride we needed and will not forget!

  110. Anton Turner says:

    Every four years, I watch the Olympics religiously as if I was a coach trying to learn the key moves to beat my opponent in the next Olympics. I love the excitement, the thrill, the dedication of everyone involved in a sport, and most importantly the hard work and passion of the athletes and coaches. During the Olympics, two favorite moments will forever live in my memory. The first was when Simon Ammann successfully became the first man in Olympic history to win gold medals in the Individual Normal Hill event in two Olympics. Simon gave it his all and performed flawlessly and I will always see him speeding toward the Earth at 60+ MPH. The second memorable moment for me was when Joannie Rochette showed exceptional bravery and took to the ice despite her mother’s death two day earlier and skated her heart out. I was proud the moment she won the Bronze medal because she proved to everyone despite her heartache and emotional strain she could perform well above the rest and secure herself a position on the Olympic podium. Joannie will always be the embodiment of the Olympic athlete, who knows when times are tough all you can do is perform your best. Joannie, I salute you and your mother would have been proud! The winter Olympics in Vancouver were one of the best winter Olympics I have seen. Many thanks to everyone involved in making this Winter Olympics both memorable and exciting without you it would not have been possible.

  111. Hmm. I’m not sure I have a favourite memory. One of my favourite moments was walking up to GM Place for the Opening Ceremony for the Paralymics Games.

    So many “disabled” kids were so STOKED and giggling and hopping with eagerness and stuff, and it just made me remember when I was a kid and would go with my dad, then a Special Education Teacher at Simon Cunningham, when the “disabled” were kept separate from the other kids. I just loved his students and his field trips were the BEST.

    It was really nice to be a part of THEIR moment, before the inevitable bad TV coverage and failed CTV support and all. For that moment, it was a pretty awesome possibility. So, yeah. :)

  112. RB says:

    I need this book as an excuse to buy a nicer coffee table.

  113. Shel says:

    I don’t know if I have one fave, but as a volunteer at Pacific Coliseum it was great to see some of the skaters in person, and seeing the support from crowds with so much red in the stands. Thanks for the giveaway.

  114. Shivani S says:

    I just got the DVDs and this would be a perfect complement for them! As for the Olympic memories…too many to choose from, I’m torn between Alex Bilodeau and Sidney Crosby’s golden goal, although I went to both Ashley Mcivor & Maelle Ricker’s medal ceremonies and hearing thousands of people singing O Canada was magical!

  115. bonnie says:

    My favourite memory from the 2010 Games was going to Downtown and feeling the olympic spirit being present around everywhere you go. Having the games being held in your hometown and seeing everyone around you wearing red and white gives a warm feeling inside along with having extra pride for being a vancourite.

  116. Sandy says:

    I have a couple of favourite moments – winning tickets to Molson Hockey House to watch Team Canada play (they won!) and Sam Roberts perform.

    To be part of all the craziness / crowd, seeing the events and meeting people while waiting in line – it was amazing how everyone came together to cheer on all the teams!

    And also getting to see Trevor Linden carry the torch!

  117. Crys says:

    It is a hard decision for me- I was an Olympic Torchbearer and an Audience Leader during the Opening and Closing Ceremonies. I think my favourite memory is the atmosphere during the Closing Ceremonies (due in part to the recent hockey win!) and getting to go and meet some of the athletes on the floor as the ceremonies finished! I am a huge figure skating fan and I got a picture with Mao Asada there. The whole experience was absolutely amazing!

  118. Devan says:

    It was a good time, and I can imagine how seeing the pictures again will bring back many fond memories for all.

  119. Caroline says:

    My favourite moment lasted 16 days! From start to finish it was awesome but when KD lang sang Hallelulah at the Opening ceremony– I was overwhelmed.

  120. Davide Tortora says:

    It’s really hard to choose just one of the million of memories. I’m Italian, I was too young to volunteer in Turin 4 years ago but I fought every single day to become a volunteer in Vancouver. I wrote thousands of emails, I called many different associations and nobody can imagine how hard I worked to obtain the free time I needed from my university or just to save money or for anything else was necessary…but, at the end, I found my boss (let’s call her “my angel”)on Facebook and she let me to volunteer in BC Place as ceremonies supporter. I still can’t say which was the best moment… maybe when I arrived in Vancouver realizing that my dream was real, or when I went inside BC Place for the first time, when I wore my blue uniform at the accreditation centre or when I cried carrying the Italian flag as “Italian flag-bearer” during one of the opening rehearsal. But, for sure, one of the most beautiful memories was the friendship, the enthusiasm and the passion showed by all Canadians, the real spirit of the games which changed my soul forever! I’m so proud of being one of you… even if just for few weeks! Thank you Canada!

  121. Nicole says:

    I loved being up at Manning Park the weekend before the Games began. We were hobnobbing with the Russian Ski Team (as much as we could as their English was very limited and all I know how to say is “Bottoms Up!” in Russian. Then word spread that at 8:30am on Sunday morning, the Flame would be passing by between Princeton and Hope. We all got up early, coffees in hand and headed down to the road with all the other guests (and the Russians) to wait for about 2 hours…having fun singing the national anthem (in English and French). We even sang the old song from 1967 “Canada, We Love Thee”. Finally an official SUV pulls up, out hops a uniformed “flame-bearer” with this minuscule lamp. We all crowded round for pictures. And then it was gone, continuing on its journey west.

  122. Beverly Chu says:

    Most exciting moment: Tesse & Virtue won Gold! Followed by the Men & Women’s Hockey Golds! The 16 medals won at this Olympics…the sky’s the limit!

  123. Tanis says:

    Winning Olympic hockey gold – both women and men’s!!!

  124. The short track event in which the two Korean skaters wiped out in the final lap. What a nail-biter!

  125. Helen says:

    The most cherished memory for me was to be “one” with all canadians
    regardless of our differences. I felt so proud to be Canadian and
    very lucky to be right here in Vancouver to be part of it all.

  126. Julie says:

    My favourite memory is when I just finished volunteering at the Oval and had gone back into Vancouver with a fellow volunteer. Just by chance, we walked into a crowd of people watching the Opening Cermonies projected onto the side of the Sears building. It was raining but to hear the crowd cheer as Canada came out was amazing. I felt so proud to be a Canadian and luckier to have experienced that moment.

  127. Jody Li says:

    The most exciting moment was when Bilodeau won the first gold medal on home soil.
    The most beautiful moment was when Tessa Virtue and Scott Moire won gold for Ice Dancing. :)

    My favorite moment was when Canada felt patriotic for once and the excitement was truly unimagineable.
    I miss the Olympics. :(

  128. KyleWith says:

    My favorite part was the passion and connection throughout the whole thing.

  129. Vincent Yan says:

    My favourite moment would be watching the mens hockey game in downtown Vancouver. That experience will never be forgotten, and hard to replicate again too. I would love a copy of this book, it looks amazing.

  130. Kerry says:

    Being in GM Place when Crosby scored the goal! Thanks for the contest.

  131. JMJ says:

    I was volunteering in downtown when an older looking lady came up to me and asked me to recommend a good restaurant. I named a few of my favourites and pointed her in the right direction. She thanked me and said “you know my granddaughter is an olympian.” Before I had a chance to ask who her granddaugter was a girl in her 20’s came towards us – a girl whose poster I have on the wall of my room and whose picture is a wallpaper on my computer. Standing in front of me was one of my idols – Team Canada women’s hockey star Tessa Bonhomme. I nearly dropped my coffee as she approached us and put an arm around her grandma. I stammered…a lot. I think I creeped her out because i kept saying “i love you.” But she was really cool. We took pictures together, talked about hockey, and then they left to go eat at one of the restaurants I’d reccommended. The greatest moment of my life!

  132. No doubt it was watching the gold medal game in a packed bar in downtown Toronto with 700 other people…

  133. Andrew Chobaniuk says:

    Watching the men’s relay team capture gold right in front of me, standing at the scorer’s platform, cheering and not caring that I was a volunteer, having the PM in the house. special night

  134. Shaylene says:

    Going to the Canada-Switzerland men’s hockey game! I went down to the glass during warmups, and it was amazing standing just a few feet away from guys like Crosby, Staal, and Doughty. There was a Canadian fan standing in front of me teasing a Swiss fan, saying things like “we’re gonna make your goalie look like Swiss cheese tonight!” How wrong he was!

    The last few moments of that game were so nerve wracking, especially because we had no idea if there was even going to be OT or a shootout. When Crosby scored, everybody went crazy, and when Marty stopped the Swiss player, we were all relieved!

  135. Inder says:

    My favourite Olympic memory:

    The fact we got to hold the Vancouver 2010 Olympics! What an honor being a canadian citizen!

  136. Susan Gittins says:

    My favourite Olympic moment was watching Jon Montgomery win his gold medal in Skeleton at the Whistler Sliding Centre. Hung around to see him afterwards but he had a slew of media interviews to do. Thought that was as good as it got, until I saw him walking past me on his infamous Whistler Village stroll, chugging down a pitcher of beer on his way. A great Canadian moment.

  137. Leeanne says:

    It was such a great party!

  138. DaddyG says:

    One of the great moments was the mashup dance on the Saturday the Olympics started and 2700 people danced together on Robson street, so improtu and helped generate the spirit we felt the whole rest of the Olympics!

  139. Maria says:

    Going to the first victory ceremony and watching as Alex Bilodeau recieved his well-deserved gold medal :)

  140. Janet says:

    Looks like an interesting book.

  141. Sanjay Iyer says:

    Looks like an interesting book. This has been the best Olympics (Summer or Winter) I can remember, especially having seen a lot more than most of you on television. I have watched at least an event of every Olympics since I was a child, beginning with Calgary in 1988. I have followed every opening and closing ceremony of every Olympics since Calgary.

    I hope to get this book, as this has been the best Olympics I can remember.

  142. Rob says:

    So many memories. I just love how the city was alive. I had just moved to Vancouver a few weeks before the games, so it was a great way to start my time here. I was also fortunate enough to go see come curling with my partner, and some sledge hockey with some friends. I think those times will stand out the most for me. Plus, for my birthday I got a plush Quatchi, which makes me very happy boy.

  143. Dominic says:

    My favourite about the olympics is that i got to go to the men gold medal hockey game and like Sidney Crosby scoring that big overtime goal that was just a big sports history and like the people cheering on the Downtown street i will never forget this

  144. E. Tang says:

    My favorite Olympic memory was watching Canada win the gold medal men’s hockey game and then joining the madness and mayhem on Granville street just minutes afterwards. What a rush!

  145. Mia says:

    I watched an TV interview with Clara Hughs, when she was asked if she considers herself the best Canadian athelete ever, she said: we have so many great athelets in Canada, I just consider myself Canadian! That’s the moment I realized that this is what the Olympics are about: we are all pround Canadians! Nothing more, nothing less! I’ve never been more proud to be Canadian, and will forever grateful for what this great country has done for me!

  146. Iris says:

    Favorite moment: watching the tribute to Terry Fox during the opening ceremony of the paralympics. Terry Fox, our everyday Canadian hero!

  147. RayRay says:

    Olympic Hockey Gold and the singing of O’Canada in the crowds.

  148. Calvin says:

    I remember when I was much younger, I saw my uncle and all these other people at BC Place on TV after they announced that Vancouver had won the right to host the Games.

    Seven years later, and I still can’t believe they’re over. I’ll always remember the free concerts, the crowds, and the spontaneous patriotism on the SkyTrain. I don’t think we’ll ever see anything like this in Vancouver for many decades.

  149. Emily says:

    My favourite memory was running down with friends to the Olympic cauldron after seeing Wayne Gretzky light it with the torch. There was so much energy and it was surreal to see the flame lit.

  150. Donna says:

    Gosh… There were so many great memories of the Olympics for me!

    From hunting down those elusive red mittens to witnessing the cauldron just before it was extinguished, from converting a non-Olympic non-sport fan who even watched the ice-dancing competition to the public outbreaks of O’Canada in the streets, to witnessing the first Canadian gold on home turf to beating the men’s US hockey team for gold, etc.

    However, I think my favourite was when my sister-in-law’s homestay student arrived after a long gruelling flight from Japan at 2PM on March 28th, the last day of the Paralympics. She understood very little English but aided with sign language we found out she had followed some of the Olympic events in Japan.

    She was excited to be in Vancouver but disappointed to have missed the Olympics. We explained she was in luck and there were still a couple hours left of the Olympic hoopla albeit the Paralympics. Her weary face lit up with rejuvenated energy!

    Off we went! I think because it was the Paralympics and it was a dreary day there was practically non-existent crowds! We managed to fit more into those few hours than in the many days I spent elbowing through the crowds in February!

    We went to the Royal Canadian Mint exhibit at library square and exchanged coins, to Canada House and met a Paralympic tennis champion, had our pictures taken with the Stanley Cup and with the Olympic torch, played virtual Shootout and snowboarded. We toured the Manitoba pavilion, saw the lanterns and art installations on Granville Street, saw the ice rink and zip line at GE Plaza (Robson Square), walked the “shopping street” (Robson), stopped for ramen that is as good as in Japan according to her (yeah Vancouver!) and made it in time to see the cauldron from the upper terrace and then to see it extinguished – ending our whirlwind Olympic experience!

    Our guest ran on adrenalin and was ecstatic to have participated in a small part of history, the remaining 2010 Olympic revelry. She clutched her pocket of well earned souvenir Olympic coins and pins as she finally closed her tired eyes on the car ride back to the house…

  151. Tyler says:

    My favorite memory? Is how Canada came together and was proud of our nation!

    That and I got paralympic accreditation ;)

  152. Linda says:

    We moved to Vancouver last summer and were not quite ready for the Olympics. We went downtown the very first weekend- the city was still waking up to the spirit. We got a wonderful sense for the once in a lifetime experience of being a host city. My very first Olympic experience- loved the entire span.

  153. Art Buffie says:

    There were so many memorable experiences but I think my favorite was the very brave and emotional performance by Joannie Rochette.

  154. Scott says:

    Maybe I should have entered the contest. Just got home from my road trip and my pre-ordered copy still has not arrived. :-(

  155. Steve says:

    Looking forward to receiving the books I ordered for my Niece and Nephew. However I’m a bit PO’d that when I originally placed the order on the VANOC ticket website it was implied that would be the only place to purchase them. Now they are available at Amazon for about $30 less than I payed.

    Sorry about the whine otherwise my Olympic experiense was fantastic.

    Steve.

  156. Fran says:

    It is July & I still have not received my copy. Like others who have responded, why are the books on sale for 50+ when we paid $85 and have not received our copies. I have sent to emails that could not be delivered to the adresses on the 2010 Olympic site. Does anyone know who I can call or email to get my book?

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