O2 West Personal Fitness Studio


Friday, July 17th, 2009 — 10:40am PDT
Comments 5

Yesterday I went for my first personal training session with Andy Shiu at O2 West. Last week John and I met with Andy to get a tour of the facility and learn a bit more about his philosophy, which were equally impressive and borderline mind-blowing.

O2 West

Andy has a strong background in the fitness industry and leads a very active lifestyle. He knows what it takes to train professional bodybuilders but also how to help seniors become comfortably mobile or how to help brides fit into their dress without drastic dieting. He built up O2 West as a state-of-the-art personal training studio and it absolutely shows. He’s got technology in there that one could only dream of using at a local gym, as well as very basic tools and equipment that can optimize any workout. Walking around and listening to Andy talk about his facility and his training practices you can truly see and hear the passion he has for this industry and lifestyle.

O2 West

O2 West isn’t a bootcamp facility, they teach and preach proper training techniques for all ages and fitness levels. “I’m not here to break you,” said Andy who firmly believes in total fitness as opposed to crash-course exercising. He added that many people may be intimidated at gyms either by other people, trainers, or even the equipment (by not knowing how to properly use it). He emphasizes education — how to use equipment, how to use and work your muscles properly, and how to get the maximum advantage out of a cross-fit training regime. It’s also a very private facility so you won’t feel like you’re in a fishbowl, exposed to passers-by on the street.

During my 1-hour session, I didn’t look at the clock once (and I swear it only seemed like 10 minutes). I was taught how to use the machines and even how to get the most out of a brisk walk on the treadmill (with short steps, long steps, and inclines). We did so many activities that when it was all over I had no idea (until he told me) that I did 100-200 reps of some of the exercises. That was because we moved so often from one stage to the next, keeping the muscles moving without over-exerting them.

O2 West looks like a dream for passionate trainers as well – and Andy only hires the best. As I could feel my muscles working in ways I haven’t used them in months, I was thinking about how sore I would be today. Andy immediately told me that if you’re sore after a workout, you have the wrong trainer. If you’re using your muscles correctly, working them out yet giving them time to move and flow, you shouldn’t be sore the next day.

If you’d like to check out O2 West, they’re currently having a contest where two couples (who are getting married any time in 2009) can win a full fitness makeover, valued at $4500. The deadline for entries was July 15th but it’s been held-over.

I go back again on Monday since Andy didn’t want to let too much time lapse between sessions in case I forgot some of the proper techniques. So far, I’m thoroughly impressed and I actually can’t wait to start up again next week. As a side (yet important) note, their change rooms also have huge showers and supply complimentary products and personal care essentials for women to use.

O2 West is located in the Oakridge area at 551 West 57th Avenue in Vancouver.

Disclosure: O2 West is also the sponsor of our softball team, the Radio Rockstars

Current contests on Miss604.com

5 comments

  1. Virginia says:

    So are you sore? I think the not being sore part seems a bit like BS – so I’m curious if you are or not.

  2. Chris says:

    This is the type of facility/program I need. I don’t know my way around the gym whatsoever and even though the few times I’ve been to one (community centre or gym at Shaw Tower), I’m generally on my own right after the fitness assessment and completely lost as to what I’m supposed to be doing. And what’s this about your muscles not supposed to be sore after? Boy have I been doing things wrong..

  3. Miss604 says:

    @Virginia it’s actually a myth that you should be sore after a workout. The soreness is caused by a build-up of lactic acid but when you train properly you keep everything flowing so this doesn’t occur. I had no soreness except a little bit in my upper abs because well, they’re pretty weak to being with đŸ˜‰

    [References on the subject: 1, 2, 3]

  4. Mr. Santa says:

    The normal fitness gym has definitely come a long way! There’s a new club open in the building I work at that has machines that you log into and it keeps track of your progress and it automatically adjusts the weight each workout. Very cool!

  5. Ryan says:

    That soreness bit is BS. You may not be sore after a workout, you don’t need to be sore after a workout for sure. However, if you are sore, it doesn’t always mean you or your trainer messed up.

    Muscle soreness is not due to lactic acid. That has been disproved years ago. Why people keep repeating this falsehood is beyond me. You own statement about your abs is quite enlightening. If it’s just about “removing lactic acid” then why are your abs sore? Your abs are sore because you stressed them in a way they aren’t used to. You may have over stressed them a bit.

    I’m sure the guy is nice and all but his little statement about no soreness is out to lunch. You may go to the gym already and this would explain why you don’t have soreness. That and the fact that to get you to 200 reps he must of been using 0 weight for each rep. There is NO reason to do 200 reps of any exercise. I don’t care how many sets you are doing. Anything over 20 reps per set is useless for anything. And honestly, anything over 10 is useless for most people. Want to be toned or strong? 3 to 5 reps for 3 to 5 sets is all you need. Google it.

    Oh one last thing, machines suck. Use free weights!

    If you really want to know the cause of DOMs, check out the following from wikipedia where you can see real sources.

    “DOMS was first described in 1902 by Theodore Hough, who concluded that this kind of soreness is “fundamentally the result of ruptures within the muscle”. This is still considered broadly valid, although DOMS does not appear to involve the rupture of whole muscle fibers.

    What has been observed to accompany DOMS are ultrastructural disruptions of myofilaments, especially at the Z-disc, as well as damage to the muscle’s connective tissue. That tissue damage may relate most directly to DOMS, as it may increase the mechanical sensitivity of the muscle nociceptors, or pain receptors, and cause pain with stretching and palpation. The delayed onset of the soreness may occur because the inflammatory response process that sensitizes the nociceptors takes some time.

    However, the relationship between damage, inflammation and DOMS is not yet completely understood.

    Two other hypotheses that have been advanced to explain DOMS, muscle spasms and the presence of lactic acid in the muscle, are now considered unlikely to be correct, since there is evidence to refute them. In particular, lactic acid is removed from the muscle within an hour of intense exercise, and can’t therefore cause the DOMS which normally begins about a day later.”

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